Photo Prompt – SILENT SCREAM

Shrieking Tree

Caught.

Forever changed.

Rooted in soil,

an arbor life.

 

Leaves gone.

Naked limbs

Tremble with effort.

Bark shifts.

 

Darkness coming.

Evil stirs.

Innocents in danger,

Seeking treats.

 

Turn back,

Run away!

A silent scream,

my only warning.

**********

I’m not a fan of Halloween, but this image was perfect and I couldn’t resist sharing it with my readers! I took this photo over a decade ago, wandering through an average middle-class neighborhood with my camera. The haunting look of anguish or fear is undeniable, and this became the first of several “tree people” images in my collection. (Next time you’re walking in the woods, see how many faces you can find.) When a friend of mine saw it, he said it reminded him of a painting by Edvard Munch. Huh? I’d never heard of him or his work and had to look it up.

the-scream

“Born in 1863 in Löten, Norway, famed painter Edvard Munch established a free-flowing, psychological-themed style all his own. His painting “The Scream” (“The Cry”; 1893), is one of the most recognizable works in the history of art. His later works proved to be less intense, but his earlier, darker paintings ensured his legacy. A testament to his importance, “The Scream” sold for more than $119 million in 2012—setting a new record.” https://www.biography.com/artist/edvard-munch

“The Scream is the best known work from a powerful series of images which Munch called The Frieze of Life, first exhibited in 1893.  The actual scream, Munch claims, came from the surroundings around the person. The artist printed ‘I felt a large scream pass through nature’ in German at the bottom of his 1895 piece. Munch’s original name for the work was intended to be The Scream of Nature. The figure is trying to block out the ‘shriek’ that they hear around them (the work’s Norwegian title is actually ‘Skrik’). The figure appears featureless and un-gendered, so it is de-individualised – and is perhaps one of the reasons why it has become a universal symbol of anxiety.”  https://blog.britishmuseum.org/10-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-scream/

Weekly Roundup – Blast From The Past 2: A VALENTINE

Weekly Roundup is an update on what’s going on in my world. Welcome!

I just rediscovered this one mixed in with my early work. It’s a Valentines Day poem I wrote for my mother in 1976 – cheesy, sappy, and poorly executed. I still love to write rhyming verses but clearly poetry is not my strong point! In the next to last line you will see my mom referred to as “Moo”, and, no, it’s not a backhanded insult. While the exact origin remains buried in the mists of yesteryear, it was a term of endearment we all used for my mother. Unfortunately, Moo did leave me back in 2000. I’m still blue.

 

A Valentine

On this Valentine’s Day of ’76,

When hearts and thoughts and lovers mix,

I thought of you, ma, and what you’ve been,

Not just to me but all our kin.

 

We’ve been through a lot over all these years,

Many a problem and a bundle of tears,

But through it all we’ve learned so much,

By your lovely smile and caring touch.

 

I picture you a gentle dove,

My thoughts of you are all of love,

And if you ever leave me, Moo,

You better believe that I’ll be blue.

###

I completed at least one very important task last week by gathering and combining all of my notes and ideas for Forbidden Moon. The next step is to assemble them into rough chapter divisions and then start writing – something I wanted to have begun on the 1st but was sidetracked by dragons. Yes, I said dragons. I have a short story (and beyond) idea I can’t shake, so I’ve taken a short detour to see where the concept leads. If anything comes of it, you’ll be the first to know!

Sales of Traitor’s Moon have been steady but slow and I must admit to being disappointed. This book deserves so much more! If you are a fan of Freebooksy, you will see it listed this Sunday. I expect it to do well and hope it generates interest in Expectant Moon at the same time. If you happen to pick up a copy, please be kind enough to leave a review. Many thanks!

The Odious Apostrophe

The Odious Apostrophe

 

Apostrophe, Apostrophe,

or should I say catastrophe?

You make me nervous, angry, mean,

You’re Satan’s punctuation scheme.

I put you in and take you out,

Confusion reigns, along with doubt.

Unlike the period or comma,

You thrive on messiness and drama.

English would be much less rotten,

If you could only be forgotten.

Alexander Elliott