Photo Prompt – SILENT SCREAM

Shrieking Tree

Caught.

Forever changed.

Rooted in soil,

an arbor life.

 

Leaves gone.

Naked limbs

Tremble with effort.

Bark shifts.

 

Darkness coming.

Evil stirs.

Innocents in danger,

Seeking treats.

 

Turn back,

Run away!

A silent scream,

my only warning.

**********

I’m not a fan of Halloween, but this image was perfect and I couldn’t resist sharing it with my readers! I took this photo over a decade ago, wandering through an average middle-class neighborhood with my camera. The haunting look of anguish or fear is undeniable, and this became the first of several “tree people” images in my collection. (Next time you’re walking in the woods, see how many faces you can find.) When a friend of mine saw it, he said it reminded him of a painting by Edvard Munch. Huh? I’d never heard of him or his work and had to look it up.

the-scream

“Born in 1863 in Löten, Norway, famed painter Edvard Munch established a free-flowing, psychological-themed style all his own. His painting “The Scream” (“The Cry”; 1893), is one of the most recognizable works in the history of art. His later works proved to be less intense, but his earlier, darker paintings ensured his legacy. A testament to his importance, “The Scream” sold for more than $119 million in 2012—setting a new record.” https://www.biography.com/artist/edvard-munch

“The Scream is the best known work from a powerful series of images which Munch called The Frieze of Life, first exhibited in 1893.  The actual scream, Munch claims, came from the surroundings around the person. The artist printed ‘I felt a large scream pass through nature’ in German at the bottom of his 1895 piece. Munch’s original name for the work was intended to be The Scream of Nature. The figure is trying to block out the ‘shriek’ that they hear around them (the work’s Norwegian title is actually ‘Skrik’). The figure appears featureless and un-gendered, so it is de-individualised – and is perhaps one of the reasons why it has become a universal symbol of anxiety.”  https://blog.britishmuseum.org/10-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-scream/